PDF Attached

 

Calls:

Corn
steady

Soybeans
steady lower

Wheat
steady

 

US
CORN – 61 PCT CONDITION GOOD/EXCELLENT VS 62 PCT WK AGO (55 PCT YR AGO) -USDA

US
CORN – 97 PCT DOUGH VS 94 PCT WK AGO (94 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

US
CORN – 79 PCT DENTED VS 63 PCT WK AGO (71 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

US
CORN – 25 PCT MATURE VS 12 PCT WK AGO (19 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

US
SOYBEAN – 65 PCT CONDITION GOOD/EXCELLENT VS 66 PCT WK AGO (55 PCT YR AGO) -USDA

US
SOYBEANS – 20 PCT DROPPING LEAVES VS 8 PCT WK AGO (16 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

US
RICE – 78 PCT CONDITION GOOD/EXCELLENT VS 76 PCT WK AGO (69 PCT YR AGO) -USDA

US
WINTER WHEAT – 5 PCT PLANTED (1 PCT YR) (3 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

US
SPRING WHEAT – 82 PCT HARVESTED VS 69 PCT WK AGO (87 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

US
RICE – 26 PCT HARVESTED VS 20 PCT WK AGO (35 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

US
COTTON – 45 PCT CONDITION GOOD/EXCELLENT VS 44 PCT WK AGO (43 PCT YR AGO) -USDA

US
COTTON – 37 PCT BOLLS OPENING VS 29 PCT WK AGO (34 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

US
COTTON – 96 PCT SETTING BOLLS VS 93 PCT WK AGO (97 PCT 5-YR AVG) -USDA

 

USDA
reported private exporters sold:

Export
sales of 400,000 metric tons of soybeans for delivery to China during the 2020/2021 marketing year; and

Export
sales of 264,000 metric tons of soybeans received during the reporting period for delivery to China during the 2020/2021 marketing year; and

Export
sales of 101,600 MT of corn for delivery to unknown destinations during the 2020/2021 marketing year.

 

Crude
oil was down sharply as the Suadi’s have said they will cut oil prices and the USD was up 73 points as of 2:30 pm CT. 

 

 

Weather
and Crop Progress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORNING
WEATHER MODEL COMMENTS

KEY
ISSUES OF THE DAY

  • U.S.
    northern Plains and Canada’s Prairies experience freezes this morning
    • Some
      damage to immature crops resulted
  • Freezes
    will occur Wednesday morning from Manitoba and far northern Minnesota through North Dakota to Montana and from Wyoming to western Nebraska and eastern Colorado
    • Damage
      to dry edible beans and sugarbeets are expected along with some immature summer crops in the west-central Plains
  • Livestock
    stress will be high in eastern Colorado and some immediate neighboring areas today and Wednesday due to cold rain and wet snow
  • Remnants
    of Typhoon Haishen have produced more heavy rain in northeastern China where the ground is already too wet and flooded from Typhoon Maysak that moved through the region last week
  • Western
    Argentina remains too dry with little change likely, although rain will fall in southern and northeastern Argentina over the coming week
  • Dryness
    in Europe will continue from France to Ukraine this week which will be good for summer crop maturation and harvesting and for planting of some winter crops
  • Drought
    remains a concern for France, the middle and lower Danube River Basin, central and eastern Ukraine, Russia’s Southern Region and western Kazakhstan – little relief expected this week
  • Flooding
    remains a concern for northeastern China’s corn and soybean country; the region must dry out for summer crop harvest – some damage to crops has likely occurred
  • Australia
    still needs significant rain to support reproduction in Queensland, northern New South Wales and northern parts of Western Australia
  • Mexico
    and Central America have trended much wetter recently and the trend will continue; relief from dryness in Honduras and Nicaragua is becoming more complete
  • West-central
    Africa remains too dry especially in Ghana and eastern coffee and cocoa production areas of Ivory Coast
  • Rain
    in South Africa during the weekend was good for wheat, barley and canola, but much more was needed

 

MORE
DETAILS FOR THE WORLD

 

  • North
    America Cold Surge Overnight Stresses Livestock And Damages Crops
    • Unseasonable
      cold settled through the Canadian Prairies and into the northern U.S. Plains overnight inducing some crop damage and more is expected tonight
      • Extreme
        lows slipped to the 20s Fahrenheit in Montana and parts of Canada’s Prairies with a few upper teens noted as well.
    • Freezes
      will occur Wednesday and parts of Montana to northern Minnesota and from Wyoming into western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northeastern Colorado
      • Damage
        is expected to dry edible beans, sugarbeets, potatoes and some heavily irrigated late season crops
      • Dryland
        crops will not be as seriously impacted because of heat and dryness in recent weeks has already advanced crops to maturity at the potential expense of yield
      • Damage
        in Canada will include some flax, corn and soybeans as well as a few late season canola crops in Saskatchewan and Manitoba
      • Livestock
        stress will be greatest from Montana to western Kansas and eastern Colorado due to falling temperatures, high wind speeds, cold rain and heavy wet snow
    • The
      moisture will be good in easing long term dryness, although more rain will still be needed
      • Winter
        wheat planting may improve in early seeding areas due to the moisture boost expected
  • North
    America Cold Surge Will Not Seriously Harm U.S. Midwest Corn Or Soybeans
    • Low
      temperatures this morning in the eastern Dakotas, Minnesota and northwestern Iowa were not low enough to cause harm to summer crops
    • Wednesday
      low temperatures will fall to the 30s in the eastern Dakotas and  western and northern Minnesota
      • Most
        freezes and frost will occur in northern and western Minnesota and eastern North Dakota with very few temperatures below 30 Fahrenheit
    • Some
      crop damage is expected, but no serious production cut will result
      • Crop
        quality issues will be possible
    • Cloud
      cover will be widespread in western Midwest Wednesday except northwestern Minnesota and North Dakota – which holds temperatures up
    • Cold
      air will be moderating by Thursday, but cloud cover will still be abundant in western Corn Belt except northern Minnesota, North Dakota and a few immediate neighboring areas which will prevent frost and freezes once again
    • Clouds
      will still be present Friday when most lows in the western Midwest will be in the 40s
  • None
    of North America threatening cold will reach into eastern Midwest, Delta or southeastern U.S.
  • Southwest
    U.S. Plains And West Texas Will Experience No Freezes
    • Rain
      and cloudiness will accompany cold air into southwest U.S. Plains helping to hold temperatures up above the damage threshold
    • Rain
      falls today through Thursday with some showers Friday in the southwestern Plains bolstering soil moisture for better wheat planting and emergence conditions and improving soil moisture in sorghum, cotton, peanut and corn production areas
      • Cotton
        boll lock is possible in some of the production areas of West Texas and areas north into southwestern Kansas because of High temperatures Wednesday and Thursday in the 50s and 60s with a few 40s and lows in the upper 30s and 40s Wednesday and Thursday with
        40s continuing Friday
        • Frost
          may be avoided because of cloudiness throughout the cold period
    • Warming
      will return late this week and into the weekend with highs back into the 70s and 80s throughout the southwestern Plains and lows in the 50s and lower 60s
  • Heavy
    wet snow from Colorado to Wyoming may bring trees and powerlines down tonight into Wednesday morning
    • Many
      deciduous trees have not lost their leaves yet
    • Notable
      transportation delays are expected, although the snow will melt relatively quickly after falling on streets and highways
    • Substantial
      early season snowfall is expected in the mountains of Wyoming and Colorado
  • U.S.
    hard red winter wheat areas will get a general soaking of rain this workweek (with snow in Colorado during mid-week) that will dramatically improve soil moisture for future wheat planting and establishment
    • Moisture
      totals of 0.60 to 1.50 inches west and 1.00 to 2.50 inches east with a few greater amounts possible in Oklahoma and south-central Kansas
    • Drier
      weather will evolve this weekend and last through most of next week
    • Temperatures
      will trend colder this workweek and then warmer this weekend through next week with temperatures back above average next week.
  • Western
    U.S. Corn Belt will get some needed rain to ease long term dryness in Iowa and neighboring areas this week
    • Rainfall
      of 0.40 to 1.50 inches will occur in the far northwest while 1.00 to 3.00 inches and a few totals over 6.00 inches from the eastern Texas Panhandle into south-central Kansas
    • Northeastern
      North Dakota and parts of northern Minnesota rainfall will be minimal this week while rain falls in most other western Corn Belt locations with totals of 0.50 to 1.50 inches resulting
    • Rainfall
      will be much more limited this weekend into next week with only one frontal system and associated rain occurring Sep. 18-19
    • Moisture
      comes too late for a serious increase in late season crop yields, but the moisture will stop the decline in crop conditions
  • Lower
    Eastern U.S. Midwest and northern Delta rainfall will be restricted next ten days with less than 0.50 inch of moisture expected which will lead to net drying
  • Rainfall
    in Great Lakes region will vary from 0.60 to 1.50 inches and locally more over the coming ten days
  • U.S.
    lower Delta and southeastern states will experience routinely occurring rainfall over the next ten days with the southeastern states wettest
    • The
      lower Delta will not get much rain until this weekend and then a daily occurrence is possible next week
  • Tropical
    Storm Paulette was over open water in the central Atlantic Ocean and will stay over open water through the next week posing no threat to land
    • Paulette
      was located 1250 miles west of Cabo Verde Islands or 1330 miles east of the Northern Leeward Islands at 18.1 north, 42.8 west at 0500 EDT today moving northwesterly at 6 mph
    • Tropical
      storm force wind was noted out 70 miles from the storm center
    • The
      storm will intensify, but stay a minimal threat to land
  • Tropical
    Storm Rene formed Monday and was 55 miles southwest of Santo Antao, Cabo Verde Islands this morning at 16.5 north, 25.7 west moving west northwesterly at 15 mph and producing maximum sustained wind speeds of 40 mph.
    • The
      storm will slowly strengthen as it moves away from the Cabo Verde Islands today through the end of this week
      • The
        storm will remain over open water in the Atlantic Ocean posing no threat of any other landmass
    • The
      storm may become a Hurricane later in the week
  • Tropical
    Wave southwest of Bermuda may move to the U.S. Carolina Coast Thursday
    • Some
      development is possible into a tropical depression, although confidence is low for now
  • Tropical
    Storm Haishen reached northeastern China Monday and moved inland through eastern South Korea earlier in the weekend before reaching China
    • The
      storm reached South Korea as a Category Two storm, but may have been a little less impactful than Typhoon Maysak was earlier last week
      • Nevertheless,
        heavy rain was noted and storm strong wind and the additional moisture over already saturated and flooded land may have caused more damage to crops and property
    • Rainfall
      through dawn today ranged from 1.00 to 6.00 inches in northeastern China and additional rainfall of 1.00 to 3.00 inches and locally more will occur through Wednesday causing greater flooding and more potential crop damage
  • Canada
    Prairies rainfall during weekend was greatest in southern and northeastern Prairies with up to 1.00 inch in southern Alberta and up to 0.62 inch in northern Manitoba and 0.43 inch northeastern Saskatchewan
    • Some
      harvest delay occurred because of rain, but other areas were dry and fieldwork advanced well
    • Weekend
      temperatures were very warm initially with highest readings in the 80s and lower 90s, but much cooler conditions occurred today with afternoon temperatures struggling to stay in the 40s and 50s Fahrenheit